Oct 25, 2019

Industry News Week 10/21/19

Contech’s Cascade Separator receives NJDEP certification; a resident in Alabama has two 55-gal rain barrels installed at her home that are preventing the city from flooding.

Contech’s Cascade Separator receives NJDEP certification; a resident in Alabama has two 55-gal rain barrels installed at her home that are preventing the city from flooding.

Contech’s Cascade Separator Receives New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) Certification

Contech Engineered Solutions announced in a press release that the Cascade Separator has received New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) Certification as an approved storm water treatment device. The certification was awarded after the Cascade Separator successfully completed testing under NJDEPs hydrodynamic separator (HDS) laboratory testing protocol and exceeded applicable pollutant removal criteria.

Designed with the aid of computational-fluid-dynamics modeling and hundreds of hours of lab testing, the Cascade Separator offers high sediment capture and retention with minimal footprint and sump depth. The Cascade Separator is approved for online use, and its hydraulic loading rate will allow engineers to specify a smaller structure compared to other HDS systems.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP)Certification program was created to provide a consistent and credible evaluation of storm water technologies to validate pollutant removal and other performance claims. 

Rain Barrels at Alabama Resident’s Home Helps City Combat Flooding

An Alabamba resident had two 55-gal rain barrels installed at her home in the Mobile suburb of Prichard, catching up to 110 gal of rainwater.

The rain barrels were installed at Patsy Stallworth’s home, free-of-charge, thanks to a storm water mitigation program organized by the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program. Christian Miller, watershed management coordinator for the Mobile Bay NEP, said the rain barrels are a big help in reducing flooding in Prichard, which is part of the Three Mile Creek Watershed.

“We’ve had a lot of issues with residential street flooding and some issues with sanitary sewer runovers, so some of the ways to combat this are to put in these rain-catchment devices,” Miller said in an article by the Alabama Newscenter. “These two 55-gal drums aren’t going to solve all of our problems, but as we get more of these out it will hopefully help to reduce these localized issues with residential flooding.”

An inch of rain falling on a typical 1,000 sq ft roof yields more than 600 gal of water, which ends up washing down streets and other hard surfaces, picking up and carrying pollutants into waterways. Miller said increased rainwater harvesting will help reduce impacts associated with residential storm water runoff, according to the Alabama Newscenter.

A New Era in Trash Capture

Hydra TMDL, the creators of the Hydra ARS and Hydra CPS systems, have been providing the storm water community with its services for over 15 years. Bio Clean Environmental is proud to announce a new collaborative licensing agreement,try. 

The Hydra ARS uses a series of patented blades that work independently to keep solid debris out of storm drains. It can also be adjusted for more restrictive flow or a looser tolerance for increased water capacity and individually changed for easy maintenance. The Hydra CPS can be retrofitted into any curb or drop inlet to help municipalities meet storm water regulations and comply with their National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) or municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) permit. 

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