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It has been a big month for water legislation. New revisions have been proposed for the “waters of the U.S.” (WOTUS) definition. The proposal would replace the 2015 Obama-era rule, which expanded the types of waterbodies that are subject to federal…
A draft of the Trump Administration’s long-awaited rule replacing the definitions used to determine what waterbodies are subject to federal jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act (CWA) was released Dec. 11, 2018. During a Dec. 10, 2018, press conference…
C+ The SWS City Report is a year-long project, where SWS and a small committee of industry professionals collaborate to assign grades to the storm water infrastructure in some of the nation’s largest cities. Modeled after the American Society of Civil…
Mountain Creek flows through the community of Red Bank, Tenn., to the Tennessee River. The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) has identified it as a 303(d)-listed stream, which means its pollution exceeds the state’s standards…
A storm water facility that outfalls at the top of a hill inevitably will cause erosion. However, there often are several competing priorities during the design phase that force the placement of the outfall. This was the case for Delaware Department of…
With growing water quality concerns over the past two decades, industrial storm water permit requirements have become ever more stringent. For more than 20 years, through its proactive environmental compliance program, a metal recycling company in the…
Accurately quantifying the problem is one of the biggest challenges to successfully controlling combined sewage overflows (CSOs). The most recent infrastructure report card published by the American Society of Civil Engineers gave U.S. wastewater systems…
Climate change challenges a fundamental principle of storm water management: the assumption of stationarity. Of course Earth’s climate has never been stationary, but for decades we have worked under the premise that our planning horizons are short enough…
The state of Illinois’ floodplain regulations needed to be simpler to read, easier to understand and less bureaucratic to encourage sound floodplain practices. It is the state Department of Natural Resources’ position that floodplain construction…
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