Jun 06, 2019

Updated Flood Control Efforts Underway in Texas Town

Leaders in the town of Sherman, Texas, have been working to update the city’s storm water utility fund

Leaders in the town of Sherman, Texas, have been working to update the city’s storm water utility fund

In Sherman, Texas, leaders recently received an updated plan on flood control when city staff updated the city’s storm water utility fund. The update included information on flood risk mitigation and the outline of future projects, according to the Herald Democrat. Projects include an $83 million detention pond project.

Flood control in the town started in 2013 when the city conduct a study of Post Oak Creek. According to the Herald Democrat, the study identified 42 flood control project with an estimated cost of $56.2 million. Two years later, a storm water utility fund was established in 2017.

The new fund also was a way to leverage income to purchase bonds for flood control and acquisition of property in the town that was flooding prone, according to the Herald Democrat. Properties acquired include a set of duplexes on Regency Circle that sustain damage from storms during summer 2017, and also a former mobile home park.

“So, this is one of the presentations that we were contemplating for the budget workshop,” said Robby Hefton, city manager Monday to the Herald Democrat. “After we put together the agenda for the workshop, we were not likely to have enough time to do everything we were planning on.”

According to the Herald Democrat, the properties have now been demolished in order to prevent future flooding.

“Another focus has been on updating the city’s flood plain maps,” said Clint Philpott, Sherman director of engineering. “This information will be used to update similar maps used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.”

According to the Herald Democrat, the floodplain shifted since the last update. Some areas are no longer considered a flood risk, but others now run the risk of flooding during a heavy storm. One area that saw a reduction in the floodplain was the intersection of U.S. Highways 75 and 82.

“If you’ve ever been there, it would be hard to believe that it would ever flood,” Hefton said to the Herald Democrat. “The owners of that gas station there are excited to be out of the flood plain because they have spent a lot of money each year having to have insurance.”

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