Sep 07, 2016

Inline Check Valve Protects Kentucky Community From Odors

A Louisville, Ky., neighborhood was plagued by unpleasant odors emanating from the community’s combined sewer system. Unwanted methane and hydrogen sulfide gases would build up in the system’s collection basins, causing a backflow of sewer odors that often resulted in complaints from the public.

At first, the municipality tried to mitigate the backflow of sewer gas from the combined sewer system by covering the pipe opening with plywood, but quickly found this method to be unsuccessful. The plywood did not effectively stop the sewer odor, and it severely diminished the pipe flow capacity. The municipality even tried using toilet cake-type deodorizers to minimize odors, but that was not enough to mitigate the problem.

The municipality had to find a more effective solution that would restore the flow capacity of the pipe and prevent sewer gas from escaping. To solve the problem, it selected a 48-in. Tideflex CheckMate inline check valve that easily could be installed without modifications to the structure.

The inline check valve was installed into the existing structure by sliding the valve into the pipe and clamping it into place. Modification of the pipe or the existing structure was not required. The installation was completed within a matter of hours. The valve has proven effective in preventing the backflow of sewer gas.

The municipality had concerns that the valve might not drain and would cause standing water. It inspected the collection basin after a large storm event and it was completely drained, proving that the inline check valve is self-draining with low headloss. Its inherent design makes it user friendly and cost-effective.

In outfall, storm water, combined sewer and sanitary sewer applications, the inline check valve’s custom-engineered, all-rubber unibody design prevents sewer system’s offending odors, while still allowing water to discharge as needed. The valve will never corrode and is designed to eliminate the backflow of unwanted sewer gases.

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