Feb 01, 2007

February 2007

Just as journalism in general has adapted and evolved over time, from partisan papers to yellow journalism and muckraking, to gonzo journalism, individual publications have adapted over time to serve evolving readerships and industries. Three years ago,…
Ever mindful of the continuing pressure to address air and water quality issues, a number of agencies, metropolitan planners and consultants are turning to pervious concrete pavements. Pervious concrete has been used since the 1980’s for a diverse range…
While porous asphalt parking lots are not a new idea, they have been rapidly catching on in recent years. The main impetus is environmental. Porous asphalt pavement allows rainwater to pass to a recharge bed made of coarse stone, which provides some…
Brookside—a neighborhood in the southern part of Kansas City, Mo.,—was planned, designed and built in the 1920s and was home to the city’s first suburban shopping area. Designed to serve the automobile, it featured specialty, grocery and drug stores, and…
The development of “green” high-performance buildings that help to regenerate degraded urban environments is essential to building sustainable communities in the 21st century. Rooftops represent an average of 22% of the total land area in major cities.…
Treatment of storm water pollution from highways has been a growing concern, especially in highly urbanized areas like southern California. For state and local departments of transportation, the pressure to clean up storm water pollution on roadways has…
By the early 1970s, only a third of the nation’s public water resources were safe for fishing and swimming. The lack of success in developing adequate water quality standards programs, combined with ineffective enforcement of existing laws, prompted the…
Current methods of monitoring combined sewer overflows (CSOs) in most municipalities still include chalk lines in troughs and blocks of wood set on walls to identify, by their presence or absence, if an overflow has occurred. These methods require…
There are several good reasons why managing storm water runoff, particularly on active construction sites, makes sense. First, from a purely resource-management standpoint, allowing storm water to remove the native soil material is not good form. Soil is…
Within our growing storm water industry, there are some analytical issues that have significant impacts on how agencies go about accepting best management practices (BMPs) for approval, how claims are made about BMP performance and how receiving waters…
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