Mar 27, 2014

March/April 2014

In early February, a failed storm water pipe running under a Duke Energy coal ash pond sent up to 39,000 tons of ash mixed with 27 million gal of contaminated water into the Dan River, which stretches more than 200 miles from North Carolina, through…
Since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency—and, in turn, state and local regulators—have gone “all-in” on green infrastructure (GI) and low impact development (LID) concepts, a seemingly regrettable consequence has emerged. Topics specific to the…
Streambank stabilization can be complex, and there are a number of elements that must be considered when designing bank stabilization measures.  For streams with erodible bed material, one essential element is providing adequate toe protection, or toe-…
Rain falls everywhere, without consideration for jurisdictional boundaries. That means that in large, older cities, rain often falls on a private landowner’s property, is collected into storm sewers owned and maintained by the local municipality,…
Business managers in the street and sewer cleaning business must be concerned with asset management and monitoring vehicles to ensure productivity, efficiency and safety. In this industry, vehicles and equipment are key to business operations and are…
When passersby reported strange smells near the intersection of Brookhurst and Hamilton in Huntington Beach, Calif., city officials looked into the matter. Though the odor was definitely sewage-like, it was discovered that it was emanating from the storm…
Mill Creek flows 28 miles from its headwaters in southeastern Butler County, Ohio, through Hamilton County, Ohio, to its confluence with the Ohio River in the heart of Cincinnati. It has historically been known for a number of ecological challenges,…
It rained on and off for 10 days straight in the village of Downers Grove, Ill., in April 2013. It rained, and then it poured, dumping 6.7 in. on the community in 24 hours. For days, standing water flooded areas of the town, which lies about 25 miles…
California, no stranger to extended dry periods, is struggling with the most extreme drought the state has endured in more than 500 years. As climate change—projected to worsen our water woes with more frequent and severe droughts—becomes the “new normal…
Humans have been treating water for thousands of years to improve their quality of life. Early technologies from the Greeks, like sand and gravel filtration, are still in use today. Modern times introduced oil and gas operations, which bring produced…
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