Oct 03, 2018

Lake Iroquois, Vt., Groups Partner to Improve Soil Stabilization

The floodplain improvement efforts included planting native trees and improving culverts

Vermont environmental groups work to improve soil stabilization at Lake Iroquois
Vermont environmental groups work to improve soil stabilization at Lake Iroquois

The Lake Iroquois Assn., the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation and the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. partnered to restore the Lake Iroquois floodplain and control sediment from sediment-laden tributaries. The extensive project involved soil stabilization, drainage and erosion control projects.

According to the Williston Observer, more than 100 native plants were planted to anchor the stream bank. In addition, culverts were improved or removed, stones were placed for erosion control and timber dams were installed to slow storm water runoff and capture sediment. Pine Shore Drive, the road nearest the most polluted stream to feed into Lake Iroquois, was regraded to more effectively manage storm water runoff.

Lake Iroquois receives water from 10 streams that flow from Williston, Hinesburg, St. George and Richmond. Nitrogen and phosphorus often find their way from the streams into the lake. The Lake Iroquois Assn. is a collaboration between towns that surround the lake and seeks to maintain and improve the lake’s ecosystem and public uses.

The association also works on water monitoring, research, education, management and advocacy in the watershed.

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